THIS BLOG IS DEDICATED TO MY TWIN BROTHER, BILL DYKES (1943-1995). WE WERE NOT ONLY BROTHERS BUT PARTNERS IN BUSINESS AND BEST FRIENDS! AND TO ALL THE "BUTCHERS" THAT HAVE PASSED ON TO THE BIG LOT IN THE SKY!

CIRCUS NOW OPEN!

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Saturday, September 10, 2011

MORE NEWS FROM BLOOMSBURG


FROM: WNEP 16, WILKES-BARRE



BLOOMSBURG PA. FAIRGROUNDS FLOODED!

PICTURES TAKE ON THURSDAY BY--

Bower Media, LLC on September 8, 2011 at 11:06pm in Bloomsburg Flood 2011


WE PLAYED THE BLOOMSBURG FAIR FOR MANY YEARS

AND HAVE A LOT OF FRIENDS FROM THAT AREA.

MAY GOD BLESS THEM AND KEEP THEM FROM HARM'S WAY!

THE FAIR IS ALWAYS AT THE END OF SEPTEMBER.

WHEN MORE IS REPORTED ABOUT THE FAIR'S PLANS WE WILL LET YOU KNOW










Friday, September 9, 2011

Ringling Spec 1969

Gyorgyzsilak



Featuring the Hungarian performers Agi and Janos Mazan.
Texan's job is a real circus


El Pasoan is one of just a few female ringmasters.



Audrey Alvarado performs as the ringmaster of the Alzafar Shrine Circus at Freeman Coliseum on Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011.Photo: Darren Abate/Special To The Express-News / SA


By Jessica Kwong


Friday, September 9, 2011


When the rainbow display of Alzafar Shrine Circus performers in the opening act clears the floor, the spotlight shines on a pedestal center stage, and you hear the ringmaster say in a sharp voice: “Ladies and gentleman. ...”
It's the voice of Audrey Alvarado, one of only a few female ringmasters in the business.
“I was a little skeptical because she is very soft-spoken, quiet,” entertainment director Alexandra Carden said. “But my husband handed her the microphone, and when she said ‘Ladies and gentleman,' we looked at each other and said, ‘Yup, that's it!'”



Performers greet the audience during opening ceremonies of the Alzafar Shrine Circus at Freeman Coliseum on Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011.Photo: Darren Abate/Special To The Express-News / SA
Alvarado, 36, is an El Paso native and the only Texan in the 68th Alzafar Shrine Circus visiting San Antonio through Sunday at Freeman Coliseum.“By tradition, it's a man's job,” said Carden, 47. “She's one to get away from having to wear a tailcoat and top hat. Her first costume is a glitter robe with rhinestones and a princess dress and tiara.”
Alvarado, who dons a bedazzled version of typical ringmaster garb later in the show, joined the circus when her mother married an acrobat. She was 4 years old.
Besides returning to El Paso for high school and some college, the circus has been her life.


An elephant performs at the Alzafar Shrine Circus at Freeman Coliseum on Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011.Photo: Darren Abate/Special To The Express-News / SA
Read more: http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/local_news/article/Texan-s-job-is-a-real-circus-2162191.php#ixzz1XRqq5e5R

Al Hall, 1928-2011

'Bozo' producer 'cracked the whip' at beloved kids show

By Erin Meyer, Tribune reporter

CHICAGO TRIBUNE

September 8, 2011

Al Hall was the man behind the scenes of "Bozo's Circus," where he made television history as director and producer of the long-running children's show.
Mr. Hall directed WGN-TV's "Bozo" show from 1961 to 1966 and returned as producer in 1973.
"Ned (Locke) may have dressed like a ringleader. But if anyone was the ringleader of the Bozo show it was Al Hall," said Joey D'Auria, who played Bozo from 1984 to 2001. "He cracked the whip and had us jumping through hoops."
Mr. Hall, 82, died after an 18-month struggle with lung cancer Tuesday, Sept. 6, at the Kellogg Cancer Center in Evanston, said his wife of 53 years, Rita.
A man of vision and self-discipline, Mr. Hall kept a "tight Scottish fist" on finances while directing a troupe of characters whose wacky antics made the show a lunchtime staple for generations of Chicago-area children.
"Al was just an amazing man," D'Auria said. "He was a firm believer in what he used to like to call the Chicago school of television. I learned that my first year on the job."READ MORE:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/ct-met-alhall-obit-20110908,0,2659368.story
Clay County Fair will have new look Sept. 10-18


Youth livestock competitions abound at the Clay County Fair. This year's fair gets underway in Sept. 10 in Spencer, Iowa.

By Jean Caspers-Simmetsimmet@agrinews.com

09/08/2011

SPENCER, Iowa — With this being his last year at the helm, Phil Hurst, secretary/manager of the Clay County Fair, could have stayed with the status quo and kept things nice and easy.
"If my plan was take it easy for my last fair, I did a poor job of it," said Hurst with a chuckle. "I could see there were things that needed to be done, and I wanted to make sure that the changes and adjustments were made while I was here. As a result, we probably did more projects than any other year."
This year's Clay County Fair, "Can't Get Enough," runs Sept. 10 to Sept. 18.
Fair visitors will see that categories of vendors have been grouped together, Hurst said. If someone is looking for model homes or RVs, they'll find them all in one area. The reorganization allowed for more vendor space.READ MORE:
http://www.agrinews.com/clay/county/fair/will/have/new/look/sept/1018/story-3904.html


Faludi Teeterboard



Uploaded by Gyorgyzsilak on Jul 14, 2011
Tele Variety Budapest 1972.

Circus is in the blood of Cornell Nicholas

from: CourierPostOnline.com

Sep. 8, 2011

Cornell “Tuffy” Nicholas never could make it as a clown, so running off with the circus wasn’t a career option.
So Nicholas did the next best thing: He bought the circus. Actually,
several of them.“I was a much better acrobat than I was a clown,” said Nicholas, the owner, producer and self-described “show maker” of a company that presents several cirque-style programs. Two of those shows — “Cirque Polynesian” and “Cirque Risqué: The Naked Circus” — are encamped at Resorts Casino Hotel in Atlantic City through September.In late July, Nicholas had actually rolled out three circuses at Resorts in a massive, 1,800-seat air-conditioned tent pitched on a parking lot at the casino. But when Hurricane Irene began bearing down on Atlantic City in late August, Cornell and the casino decided to strike the tent and move two of the three shows into Resorts’ Superstar Theatre.“We decided it just didn’t make sense to put the tent back up for just a couple of weeks, so we moved everything inside,” he explained. “And I’m glad we did. The tent was great, but it’s much more comfortable and intimate (indoors).”Nicholas and Resorts mutually decided to scrap the Great American Circus because the end of summer was looming and the family audience the show catered to was going to disappear as kids headed back to school.Moving the productions indoors presented a new set of challenges to Nicholas and the cast of the shows. Instead of performing in a tent with plenty of overhead space for the performers, the acts had to be adapted for a showroom that has virtually no fly space over the stage.That meant that the so-called “strap acts” — aerial artists whose routines are performed high above the stage — had to adjust their performances for a stage that had less than 15 feet of useable space above it.“But as circus performers, that’s what we do,” said Nicholas. “You adapt to the space that’s available. It’s been challenging, but it’s also been a lot of fun.”Nicholas is a circus brat, born and bred. His father was a longtime circus ringmaster who coined the circus-opening phrase, “Ladies and gentlemen, children of all ages.” His mother was a bear trainer who toured the world.READ MORE:
http://www.courierpostonline.com/article/20110909/ENT/309090008/Circus-blood-Cornell-Nicholas
Rides offer spins, loops and whirls

By News-Sentinel Staff,

from: lodinews.com

September 8, 2011

The rides you have come to know and love will return this year at the Grape Festival.
Andrea Owen, marketing director for Butler Amusement, said 40 percent of the rides at the festival are geared toward families where children can ride with their parents if they are at least 3 feet or taller.
“These are rides which accommodate adults as well as children. ... This is a wonderful way to spend time with your child,” Owen wrote in an email.
But out of the 28 different rides at the festival, there are still many geared toward adults.
One of the most popular rides every year for teens and adults is the Ring of Fire, an upside down roller coaster for riders that are at least 4 and 1⁄2 feet tall. Riders make a loop in a “ring of fire,” and then the train pauses at the top before catapulting backwards.
“Love of the Midway is a burnin’ thing, and in this case, it makes a fiery ring,” Owen wrote.
For teens, there is the Orbiter, a ride with colorfully lit up arms that will twirl riders around. The ride features four arms with strapped in seats and riders will quickly spin around while lifted off the ground.
All riders will be seeing double after going on the whirling and spinning Super Round Up. About 42 riders at least 4 feet tall will strap into the ride while standing up, and the centrifugal force will push riders against the wall while the ride becomes vertical.
“All of this makes for a fun vertical spin in open air,” Owen wrote.
For younger kids that might not yet be tall enough to get on the rides, there is also Toon Town, a fun house designed for children. It features moving floors, mirrors that distort objects and a slide that goes from the second story to the ground.
Butler Amusement, a 40-year-old company, provides the rides at the festival every year and is the largest carnival company in the western United States. It operates more than 120 amusement rides in seven states including Washington, Oregon and Arizona.

Thursday, September 8, 2011

Frontierland Hoedown Happening flash mob with Disney characters at Magic Kingdom
Kelly Miller Circus Rep Answers Critics Before Friday's Show at Sandburg

Community supports the Kelly Miller Circus, District 205 Foundation leader says.


The Kelly Miller Circus features three elephants in its one-ring circus act. Credit Kelly Miller Circus

By Steven Schering


September 7, 2011

The big top will soon be rising at Sandburg Middle School as the Kelly Miller Circus arrives in Elmhurst for two shows, at 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 9.
The old-fashioned, one-ring circus is quite a bit smaller than the three-ring Ringling Bros., but circus officials say that works to their advantage
" I grew up in Maywood and used to see the Ringling Bros. at the International Amphitheater in Chicago,” said Kelly Miller Circus General Manager Jim Royal. “We used to have to look down on the aerialists from the balcony.
"Our tent seats 1,100 people, and the last row of seating is only 40 feet from the ring. You can see our performers expressions and they can really connect with the audience.”
Kelly Miller Circus was founded in 1938 as Miller Bros. Circus by Obert Miller and his sons, Kelly and Dory. In 2007, the circus was purchased by John Ringling North II, whose great uncles were the famous Ringling Bros. The show began performing as Kelly Miller Circus in 1984 and has been a primary fund-raiser for the District 205 Foundation for more than 10 years.




Kelly Miller Circus and its fire-breathing performer(BRIAN LAPALME) is coming to Elmhurst Sept. 9. Credit Kelly Miller Circus

“It’s a nice event because the community can benefit from it,” said Lisa Fanelli, District 205 Foundation executive director. “Even if your kids don’t attend school here, you’re welcome to attend.”
The show features jugglers, clowns, acrobats, aerialists, horses, camels, tigers and elephants. Traditional circus favorites such as popcorn and cotton candy will be available to guests.
“We found when we reverted to a more traditional format in 2007 that we’ve gotten nothing but positive feedback,” Royal said. “We perform under a tent, not in an arena primarily designed for basketball. Our tent is specifically designed for this performance.
“If people come out by 9 a.m. Friday, they’ll get to see Lisa, one of our elephants, help raise the big top. We have a tour guide and they’ll be able to go inside the tent as Lisa raises the last of four poles.”
Captive Audience, Captive Animals
But some people feel circus life is harmful to the animals, and the Kelly Miller Circus has had to answer to its share of critics.
Representatives from People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals say over the years they have had concerns about Kelly Miller Circus, and Carson and Barnes Circus, which leases some of the animals to Kelly Miller Circus.
“We definitely have concerns over how the animals are treated,” said Delcianna Winders, director of captive animal law enforcement for PETA. “If you look behind the veil you can see what we’re talking about.”
Winders claims last month three tigers under the care of Kelly Miller Circus staff escaped from their enclosures, and two of them bit a horse. She also said staff took 30 minutes to get them back into their cages. Winders claims Kelly Miller Circus was cited by the USDA for the incident.
She said Carson and Barnes also was cited by the USDA after an elephant was allegedly beaten with a bull hook, however they were not performing with Kelly Miller Circus at that time.
Royal strongly disputes that there is any animal abuse under his watch.
“We are conscious of the safety of all of our animals and guests,” he said. “We’re regulated by the USDA and we regularly receive surprise inspections throughout the year.”
Royal says Kelly Miller Circus performs more than 200 shows per year and is regulated heavily by city, state, township and federal agencies every week. Royal claims the only incident the USDA has mentioned since 2007 is one in which a clown, who performs with his pet poodle, did not have the poodle registered with the USDA.
“We’re not hidden in an arena,” he said. “We’re in the open and the public has access to our areas. The various groups associate their names and reputations with us and we have to be at our best at all times to be successful.”
Carson and Barnes Circus was cited 12 times by the USDA over an eight-year period, according to PETA. All of the violations were corrected; many more inspections resulted in no violations from the USDA.
'Community Supports It'
“We understand it is a controversial issue to some,” said District 205 Foundation's Fanelli. “We have the Elmhurst Police Department check out the circus to see if there are any violations and have spoken to people about the circus. It seems like the community, as a whole, supports it.”
Tickets to the circus are available in advance for $14 for adults and $8 for children age 2 to 8. Tickets prices will be $2 more if purchased at the door.

DO YOU REMEMBER?

Miss Nova--Foot Juggling

Culpepper & Merriweather Circus Performs in Pacific, Missouri


Raising the Circus Big Top

Just hours before the ringmaster cracked the whip for the Culpepper & Merriweather Circus performers to enter the big top, the tent crew drove 75 stakes into the Liberty Field site and secured lines to 16 quarter poles and two center poles. The Pacific Lions Club hosted the traveling show, complete with lions and a tiger, for four performances Sept. 2-3.

Sep 7, 2011.

By Pauline Masson, Pacific Editor

Circus workers early Friday began to set up the big tent for two days of circus performances in Liberty Field.
Just hours before the ringmaster cracked the whip for the Culpepper & Merriweather Circus performers to enter the big top, the tent crew drove 75 stakes into the Liberty Field site and secured lines to 16 quarter poles and two center poles.
The circus crew raised the 3,600-pound blue and white striped big top at 10 a.m. in time for the Friday evening shows. The tent is 120 feet long by 80 feet wide. It is 30 feet tall at its highest point and is divided into three sections.
The Pacific Lions Club hosted the traveling show, complete with lions, a tiger, horses, trapeze and high-wire performers. The circus performed for four shows, two each on Friday and Saturday, Sept. 2-3.
“They tell us we’re the only town on their 32-week season where they stay for two days,” said Stephen Flannery III, Lions Club president.
Bank Star, Citizens Bank, Reed Insurance and Omer & Associates sponsored the circus, which is a major fundraiser for the Pacific Lions Club.


Circus Big Top in Liberty FieldA flag flew above the bright blue and white striped Culpepper & Merriweather Circus big top set up in Liberty Field for the Sept. 2-3 shows hosted by the Pacific Lions Club. The 3,600-pound tent is 120 feet long by 80 feet wide, and 30 feet tall at its highest point. It is divided into three sections. Circus crews raised the big top at 10 a.m. Sept. 2 in time for the Friday evening shows.
Melanie Reeves, Labadie, and her two daughters Kinzie and Kylie, arrived at the park at 9:30 a.m. and were able to see the big blue and white striped tent go up. They also visited with Simone Dykes, trapeze artist, ringmaster and preshow tour guide.
“I wanted to bring my daughters to see the activities,” Reeves said. “I went on the Internet and saw there would be a pre-show tour.”
The Hugo, Okla.,-based traveling show tours from March to October bringing trapeze and high-wire artists, unicycles, clowns and a circus midway.
In Pacific, the circus had two sold-out performances at their last visit here.
“The funds will be used to aid with our major charity which is eye care,” Flannery said.
Pacific Lions assists with eye care or glasses, seeing eye dogs, the Missouri School for the Blind and people who need financial assistance.
Los Angeles County Fair offers food, fun and adventure for all


Crowds fill the Fairplex fair grounds Saturday for opening day of the L.A. County Fair in Pomona. Photo Credit: Katie Grayot / Daily Sundial

By Angela Braza

September 7th, 2011

from: www.sundial.csun.edu Section: Arts & Life

With opportunities to ride elephants, interact with sharks and try the ever-so-daring fried Kool-Aid, the 89th annual Los Angeles County Fair has opened its doors and promises fairgoers a promising outing filled with adventure.
Open now through Oct. 2 at the Fairplex grounds in Pomona, the L.A. County Fair invites people of all ages to join the fun and festivities.
A handful of exciting and interactive exhibits dominate the grounds.
The Live Shark Encounter is a must-see exhibit. Located in building 5, this showcase allows audiences to witness the interaction between these real, sharp-toothed creatures and professional divers. While the exhibit is sure to draw a few gasps, it also serves as a genuine learning experience, as audience members are given the opportunity to increase their knowledge on various shark facts and myths.
For those who prefer the cute and cuddly, Esmeralda’s Traveling Circus is home to a variety of goats, donkeys, ducks, alpacas, pigs and more. The Great American Petting Zooallows young children to get close to these trained, well-adored animals.
The main attraction at Esmeralda’s Traveling Circus is the Elephants on Parade experience. For a small fee, families can ride one of two professionally trained elephants. Parents and children alike will squeal with delight as they ride high atop the enormous mammals.
Thrill-seekers will find no greater adventure than the 70 exhilarating carnival rides to choose from. The carnival section of the park also provides guests 40 entertaining games to take part in. There is a continuous feeling of excitement in the air as the fair guests navigate through multiple Ferris wheels, rollercoasters and fun houses.read more:
http://sundial.csun.edu/2011/09/los-angeles-county-fair-offers-food-fun-and-adventure-for-all/

And for Resorts’ Next Act...

By David J. Spatz from: www.atlanticcityweekly.com

Sep. 7, 2011

ATLANTIC CITY — Cornell “Tuffy” Nicholas never could make it as a clown, so running off with the circus wasn’t a career option.
So Nicholas did the next best thing: he bought the circus. Actually, several of them.

“I was a much better acrobat than I was a clown,” says Nicholas, the owner, producer and self-described “show maker” of a company that presents several cirque-style programs. Two of those shows — Cirque Polynesian and Cirque Risqué: The Naked Circus — are encamped at Resorts Casino Hotel in Atlantic City through September.In late July, Nicholas had actually rolled out three circuses at Resorts in a massive, 1,800-seat air-conditioned tent pitched on a parking lot at the casino. But when Hurricane Irene began bearing down on Atlantic City in late August, Cornell and the casino decided to strike the tent and move two of the three shows into Resorts’ Superstar Theater.

“We decided it just didn’t make sense to put the tent back up for just a couple of weeks, so we moved everything inside,” he tells Atlantic City Weekly. “And I’m glad we did. The tent was great, but it’s much more comfortable and intimate [indoors].”

Nicholas and Resorts mutually decided to scrap the Great American Circus because the end of summer was looming and the family audience the show catered to was going to disappear as kids headed back to school.

Moving the productions indoors presented a new set of challenges to Nicholas and the cast of the shows. Instead of performing in a tent with plenty of overhead space for the performers, the shows had to be adapted for a showroom that has virtually no fly space over the stage. 

That meant the so-called “strap acts” — aerial artists whose routines are performed high above the stage — had to adjust their performances for a stage with less than 15 feet of useable space above it.

“But as circus performers, that’s what we do,” says Nicholas. “You adapt to the space that’s available. It’s been challenging, but it’s also been a lot of fun.”

Nicholas is a circus brat, born and bred. His father was a longtime circus ringmaster who coined the circus-opening phrase, “Ladies and gentlemen, children of all ages.” His mother was a bear trainer who toured the world.

Born in Sarasota, Fla., the winter home of many circus troupes, Nicholas began performing in the circus as a child and went on to do just about every job there is under and outside the big top. He was an acrobat until he was sidelined by a circus accident at age 17 that fractured his skull.

He began working in circus concessions selling cotton candy and lemonade, where he realized there was more money to be made selling circus treats than hanging upside down from a trapeze 40 feet off the ground. It was safer, too.
READ MORE AT:http://www.atlanticcityweekly.com/arts-and-entertainment/curtain-call/And-for-Resorts-Next-Act-129395958.html

Wednesday, September 7, 2011

Gene Autry Tribute

FROM AUSTRAILIA

Life a circus for Kenyan acrobats



Mitchell Hamilton 7th September 2011Acrobats in the Loritz Circus Out of Africa are, from left, Geoffrey Odindo, Elvis Odindo, Elvis Mumbo, Victor Odindo, Peter Ndungu, and Erick Odienge.


Cathy Adams Mitchell Hamilton


7th September 2011




THE Royal Kenyan Acrobats have confirmed what every child already knows; that nothing compares to a life in the circus.
Group leader Geoffrey Odindo, who is in town for the Loritz Circus, said no job was as good as his.
"What we do is the best, we've been doing it for two years and I still don't want to quit," he said.
"You get to travel, you meet people, you leave them and meet more new people.
"It's a good life."
The group started performing in Kenya and came to Australia two years ago after spending time entertaining crowds in England, Netherlands and a prince in Saudi Arabia.
"We were inspired by other people back home and were lucky enough to get a job with the Loritz Circus," Mr Odindo said.
He said despite the excitement of a life in the circus he still sometimes misses his native country and has plans to return one day.
"When it's all over maybe I'll go back home and start a circus school," he said.
They are never in one place long, but organiser Sue Wilson said the group tries to mix in the communities they visit, particularly the African community.
"There was a suburb in Brisbane we went to called Moorooka where a lot of people with African backgrounds live so they went out and talked to the people; they got to talk in Swahili," she said.
"One of them is from a Baptist church in Kenya so he always goes to the local community Baptist people in the area and entertains the people there."
Ms Wilson said even though the theme was "Out of Africa", the show featured a selection of international performers.
"We've got aerial acts from a Chinese troupe, clowns and miniature horses," she said.
"They (the acrobats) do about five different things and there is little Americus the hula hooper."
Americus has previously performed on the Oprah Winfrey show and New Zealand's Got Talent.
The circus runs from today until Sunday with tickets starting at $16 for children and $22 for adults.
Ms Wilson said people had to be turned away from their show in Byron Bay last week so bookings are recommended.


FROM THE UK

Russia’s famed circus arrives with brand new spectacular



Valeriy Shcherbakov, Valery Kashkin, Olga Alexabderova, Minkail Matushin, and front Valentina Rumyantseva.




Published on Tuesday 6 September 2011
RUSSIA’S top performers are rolling in to Ripley with the Moscow State Circus coming to town.The legendary circus troupe will be performing a series of shows in the grounds of Ripley Castle, near Harrogate, this week.
The newly devised production, called Babushkin Secret, is inspired by a Russian fable.
The show is set under Soviet rule in 1927 when a group of Bolsheviks try to track down lost family jewellery which has been hidden in a chair forming part of a dining room set.
It will be housed in a specially designed big top to accommodate the complex rigging for the aerial acts, while being supported by only four ‘king’ poles.
The show’s producers have promised a revolving aerial chandelier.
The production also features human pyramids stretching 30ft in the air, and acrobats catapulting themselves across the big top at breakneck speed.
One circus spokesman said: “This show takes us on an incredible journey in the company of the greatest circus performers on earth.
“It features a mammoth cast of Russia’s most talented circus artists, many of which have never performed in Britain, and combines contemporary and classical circus in a way never before witnessed.”
The production runs from tomorrow (weds) until Sunday.


Circus coming to Rochester, NH Fair allegedly cited for living conditions of animals
By LARRY BROWN lbrown@fosters.com


Wednesday, September 7, 2011


ROCHESTER, NH — Despite concerns from a local resident and information gleaned from People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals' (PETA) website, Coronas of Hollywood, the familiar circus that attends Rochester's Fair, will do so again this year.
According to PETA's website, Coronas of Hollywood has had 21 Animal Welfare Act violations dating back to 1997.
"Circus Hollywood has failed to meet minimal federal standards for the care of animals used in exhibition as established in the Animal Welfare Act (AWA). The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has cited Circus Hollywood for repeated failure to provide a program of veterinary care, failure to provide shelter from the elements, failure to provide environmental enrichment to primates for the promotion of the animals' psychological well-being, failure to provide adequate space, and providing animals with dirty drinking water," reads PETA's website.
Serge Coronas, owner of Circus Hollywood (Coronas of Hollywood), said, the only violation the USDA ticketed him with this year was a "fly problem." According to Coronas, the entire State of Florida had a fly problem this year because of the wet weather, and not because of unfavorable conditions.
"PETA is PETA," said Coronas. "If we did anything wrong, they (USDA) would shut us down."
The fair's general manager, Mark Perry, also said he was unaware of the company ever having a problem in Rochester.
"If there were any issues concerning them, I would certainly know about it," Perry said. "Their animals are well taken care of up here."
Coronas, who said his family has been in the business for four generations, added that a lot of the old structures for the circus are being torn down to make way for newer ones.
"The Rochester Fair would not have us there if it wasn't a clean operation," he said.
UniverSoul Circus pitches big top at Chene Park

Ursula Watson/ The Detroit News

September 07. 2011

Expect a huge helping of the unexpected when the ever lively UniverSoul Circus pitches its big top at Detroit's Chene Park starting Thursday. Audiences will be treated to a diverse troupe of 14 acts, including new talent like Ethiopian contortionist Rahel; Chain Reaction, the two-wheeling daredevils from China; and acrobatic troupe Russian Swing. And, of course, the circus will feature talented critters like crafty canines and toothy tigers.
UniverSoul is a jubilant combination of circus arts, theater and music ranging from pop and classic R&B to Latin, hip-hop and more.
It's not just a circus; it's a highly interactive party that encourages audience members to groove along with ebullient ringmaster Tony Tone, form a "Soul Train" dance line or lend their voices to a sing-along.
"The joy that people are getting, the laughter in the audiences, it seems like it is greater than ever," says UniverSoul spokesman Hank Ernest. "You feel the energy from the audience because of the combination of acts and the ringmaster. People are going home and telling their friends and that's why our shows are often sold out.
"This show is for everybody, whether you're from in town or from the suburbs, young or old."
Now in its 18th year, UniverSoul was founded in Atlanta by concert and theater promoter Cedric Walker. Ernest says Walker developed his love of the circus as a child.
"After the show ended, he said he wanted to run away with the circus," Ernest says of Walker. "He had this tucked away in the back of his head even while he became an impresario in the entertainment industry."
During the off-season, Walker travels the globe, says Ernest, in search of new talent.
Dance group the Transformers, which sets the high-energy tone of the show, is the opening act this year, says dancer and Detroit native Gary Beauford. Beauford, who served for four years in the Air Force, has been with the dance group for eight months.
"Our act is basically a combination of hip-hop that you see today on shows like 'So You Think You Can Dance' and 'America's Best Dance Crew,' " he says. "There's choreography, freestyle, breaking, popping, cutting and a gymnastic element."
The Henry Ford High School grad will make his home in Washington, D.C., after the circus shuts down for the season; in the meantime, he says he can't wait to get back to Detroit.
"To be able to see my friends from middle and high school, my mom and just chill with my family for a while," he says. "I am going to love it, just enjoy it."
UniverSoul Circus7:30 p.m. Thursday-Sept. 18 Chene Park 2600 E. Atwater, Detroit Tickets $12-$28; free for children younger than 1 Call (800) 745-3000


UniverSoul Circus Sneak Peek!
Fair goers enjoy a ride at the Maryland State Fair September 3, 2009 in Timonium, Maryland. Due to the current economic climate and the increasing number of families taking 'staycations', local fairs have once again become a popular form …
Read more:
http://www.abc2news.com/dpp/news/region/baltimore_county/boy,-9,-injured-while-getting-off-ride#ixzz1XCutKuQG

Rochester, NH Fair is building on last year's success


Rochester Fair Manager Mark Perry displays one of 385 different local milk bottles from yesteryear — this specimen is from French's Dairy in Dover — along with the plate from milkman Eddie Leslie's delivery truck. Leslie passed away in 2008, and his family recently bequeathed his collection of dairy artifacts to the Rochester Fair museum, where it is being prepared for viewing. John Nolan/Times photo

By JOHN NOLANjnolan@fosters.com Tuesday, September 6, 2011ROCHESTER — How many people attended last year's Rochester Fair? As usual, that's a closely guarded secret, but indications are that attendees were well in excess of the 125,000 figure occasionally given out by General Manager Mark Perry.
Among the signs of recent success are a brand new tractor chugging round the grounds and a major upgrade to the fairground's electrical system. In addition, the pricing formula introduced last year is being repeated.
"Last year's pricing structure was extremely well received. Hence the reason we are doing it again," said Perry.
The 136th Rochester Fair will open at 4 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 16 and run through the evening of Sunday, Sept. 25. The admission cost for everyone aged three to 103 will again be $10 at the gate, with the bonus being a bracelet that allows the wearer to have unlimited free rides on the midway. Thus, a family of four will pay $40 admission, but then enjoy rides all afternoon and evening for free — a saving of $72 on the previous cost of four mechanical rides bracelets.
No one can go on a ride without a bracelet, which brought dismay to quite a number of people who snuck in through holes in the fence on the fair's opening day in 2010, said Perry.
"They were trying to beat the system, but you can only get a bracelet at the gate," he said. To thwart other enterprising citizens, the color of the fair bracelets is changed daily, and as folks leave the fair, their bracelets are snipped off their wrists and collected.
"People get creative when times are tough," said Perry with a grin, adding, "Without argument, ours is the best pricing structure of any fair in New England."
He pointed out that admission to fairs such as Fryeberg and Deerfield is also $10

Tuesday, September 6, 2011

RINGLING-PEORIA


A carnival in Scotland


by dawnevelyn on Sep 2, 2011
Circus cowboy grew up on horses, rodeo tricks in KC


Trick roper and animal trainer Andre McCain (center), a star of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, was joined by mentor Rex Purefoy and McClain’s fiancee, Daniele Giampaoli, on a recent visit to his alma mater, the Paseo Academy

By ROBERT TRUSSELLThe Kansas City Star
Andre McClain was a grown man by the time he ran away to join the circus.
But that’s essentially what he did.
McClain grew up near 59th Street and the Paseo and often rode his horse Storm to high school at the Paseo Academy. He had been around rodeos since early childhood but had never seen a circus until he was an adult. That was in Denver, where he managed a clothing store.
He tells a story about how he auditioned for the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, which on Wednesday begins a five-day stand at the Sprint Center. He presented himself as a horse trainer and trick rider. But he had to do it without a horse. And he was auditioning for none other than Kenneth Feld, CEO of Feld Entertainment, which owns the storied circus.


Rex Purefoy, a frequent performer in the American Royal Parade, tosses a lasso over Ringling Bros. star Andre McClain and his fiancee, snake charmer Daniele Giampaoli.
They have talent scouts that go all over the country, so the scout said, ‘You know, Kenneth Feld wants to see what you do,’ ” McClain recalled. “I was living in Denver, so he said they’d pay all my expenses and everything if I’d go down to Austin, Texas, to audition for him. So I got my truck and trailer and loaded my horse, and in Oklahoma the truck broke down.”
At that point he had no choice but to hop in a car and drive to Austin.
“Everyone was there waiting,” he said. “I have no horse. I’ve got a rope, I’ve got a whip and I’m thinking, ‘Andre what are you gonna do? What are you gonna do?’
“So they had the thing the elephants stand on in the middle of the show, so I grabbed it real quick, pulled it into the middle of the ring, gave the sound guy my music and I said, ‘Ladies and gentlemen, children of all ages, I am Andre McClain and this here is my invisible horse, Jonah.’


Purefoy, a veteran trick-roper and horseman, instructs his horse to “laugh” during a recent visit to the Paseo Academy.
“And I looked over and Kenneth Feld was crackin’ up laughing. And I sang the national anthem after that and I did some ropin’ and some whip stuff and after that he walked up to me and said, ‘If you want this job it’s yours.Read more:
http://www.kansascity.com/2011/09/05/3122508/ringling-circus-performer-grew.html#ixzz1XAKv9zCF




Fair Vendor Offers Maggot Sandwich


Published on Sep 6, 2011 by AssociatedPress

Jungle George's Exotic Meats and Bugs offers fairgoers an adventurous treat: The maggot sandwich. (Sept. 6)

Circus entertains families at Balmoral Park racetrack


Christian Saavedra keeps his eyes on the tigers while watching the Kelly Miller Circus show during its stop at Balmoral Park in Crete, IL on Monday 5, September, 2011 Matt Marton~Sun-Times Media

BY MATTHEW BRUCE Correspondent

September 5, 2011

Updated: September 6, 2011

Bunny-hopping tigers, tumbling Brazilians and a trio of elephants standing upright on their hind legs.
That was the scene this weekend as the Kelly Miller Circus came to the Southland, hitting Balmoral Park racetrack in Crete for a two-day stint Sunday and Monday.
It was Kelly Miller’s first stop in the Chicago area this year as it prepares to wrap up its nationwide tour next month. The two-hour show featured aerial acrobatics, a high-flying trapeze performer, clowns, jugglers, an Argentinean tumbling family and several animal acts. The show lit up the big top four times over the Labor Day weekend, performing twice each day it was at Balmoral.



Expert tiger trainer Ryan Holder works with tigers during the Kelly Miller Circus show at its stop at Balmoral Park in Crete, IL on Monday 5, September, 2011 Matt Marton~Sun-Times Media

“We believe this is one of the premier circuses around,” Kelly Miller road office manager Tavana Brown said. “It’s a big top, so it’s a whole different atmosphere than a civic center or a big stadium.”
Brown said the Oklahoma-based Kelly Miller show offers one of the last tented circuses in the United States And she said it’s one-ring format provides for a more intimate experience for fans than at a Ringling Bros. show.
“If you sit ringside, the elephants are right there in your face,” she said. “They can sneeze right in your face sometimes.”


Mike Rice walks with camels in the Kelly Miller Circus show during its stop at Balmoral Park in Crete, IL on Monday 5, September, 2011 Matt Marton~Sun-Times Media


This year’s act was dubbed the “Wild West” edition, featuring tiger tamers, trained camels, a cowboy rope spinner, a dog-and-pony act and an all-American patriotic Wild West salute as a finale. The show travels 38 weeks from February to October, journeying from Texas to New Hampshire hitting stops all along the way before making its way back to headquarters in Hugo.
The show also included the lithe Poema family featuring an acrobatic routine in whicv the father juggles his children with his feet.
“It’s a great show. The little kids flipping were awesome,” said Park Forest resident Matthew Brooks, who brought his kids out for Monday’s show.
The festivities also included pony, camel and elephant rides before the show began and during intermission. Tinley Park tot Elle Villari hit the show with her brother Trevor. Trevor was most impressed with the aerial trapeze performers swinging from rings high atop the tent, while Elle liked the elephant act.
“It’s lots of fun,” she said.
The show left town Monday, but is not quite done in the Southland. It made a pit stop in Midlothian on Monday before heading to Posen and Berwyn later this week.

Something for everyone For the 32nd consecutive year, organizers of the Labor United Celebration have gone all out to deliver a "close to home, low cost and family-oriented" festival, taking place today and Monday at Northmoreland Park, Allegheny Township. Admission, parking and live performances, including the circus, are free. There's rides, food, entertainment, a flea market, and a craft show. Dan Carpenter
from: http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/valleynewsdispatch/lifestyles/s_754583.html
Classic Hollywood: Doctors, lawyers invade TV in '61

Sitcoms such as 'Dick Van Dyke,' 'Hazel' and 'Phil Silvers' reigned also.

By Susan King, Los Angeles Times

September 5, 2011

Variety shows

Variety was a staple of TV in this period, and perhaps the most offbeat one was NBC's "International Showtime," hosted by movie star Don Ameche. Each week, Ameche would present various European spectaculars, including circuses and ice shows. Though never a huge ratings' success, the series continued through 1965.


In Everett, the circus arrives and so do protests

JACKSON HOLTZ, The Herald of Everett

Sunday, September 4, 2011

EVERETT, Wash. (AP) — Carol is magnificent.An Asian elephant, she is massive, some 7,100 pounds and nearly 10 feet tall. She trumpets when her handler praises her. It's a noise that sounds a bit like a bird, high pitched, eerie, from another world. At 38, Carol's age shows in pink and gray freckles on her wide and dimpled forehead.
Along with Patty and Duchess, the giant creatures from Thailand are the pachyderm stars of "Boom a Ring," the latest Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus to play at Comcast Arena. The show opens Thursday and runs through the weekend.
During the circus, Carol will defy her hulk and dance with the agility of a ballerina. The elephant will salute the audience with her long trunk, twirl in place, sit down and perform a headstand.
"The audience loves that," said Catherine Carden, Carol's handler and a seventh-generation circus performer.
She tours with her husband, Brett, also a multi-generational circus performer, and their children, George and Cash. The Cardens spend about 40 weeks a year traveling with the circus, shepherding a menagerie that includes two camels, three horses, two ponies, a mini pony and 10 dogs.
Still, no animal draws as much response -- good and bad -- as the family's three elephants.Read more:
http://www.seattlepi.com/news/article/In-Everett-the-circus-arrives-and-so-do-protests-2155378.php#ixzz1XAN5bQVT

Monday, September 5, 2011

LABOR DAY HUMOR---




Circus clown trains Ohio troubled teens


In this Aug. 2, 2011 photo, Paul Miller of Circus MOJO juggles rings with a student on the Gym Wheel at Hillcrest School in Wyoming, Ohio. Miller's Cincinnati-based circus arts program teaches students how to juggle, walk on stilts, balance on a giant ball and some tumbling in addition to the real objectives — team building and boosting self-esteem. Photo: The Enquirer, Joseph Fuqua II / AP

KIMBALL PERRY, The Cincinnati Enquirer

Sunday, September 4, 2011 CINCINNATI

(AP) — Paul Miller's hands were a blur — toss, catch, toss, catch - keeping three colored balls in the air as eight teens watched, wondering what juggling had to do with their stay at Hamilton County's school for juvenile criminals.
"We're trying to show them there are things out there besides the streets," said Juvenile Court Judge Karla Grady.
Miller, owner of Circus Mojo, has completed two programs at Hillcrest Training School. The Springfield Township correctional and treatment school is for delinquent males ages 12-18 and too often the last stop before juvenile prison.


His Cincinnati-based circus arts program teaches students how to juggle, walk on stilts, balance on a giant ball and some tumbling in addition to the real objectives — team building and boosting self-esteem.
"It teaches them responsibility, teamwork, respect and commitment. All of that influences their academics and influences their home life," said Debbie Hill, of the nonprofit Community Arts Initiatives, the agency that paid for the $6,000, six-week program at Hillcrest.




In this Aug. 2, 2011 photo, Paul Miller of Circus MOJO works with a student on the Gym Wheel at Hillcrest School in Wyoming, Ohio. Miller's Cincinnati-based circus arts program teaches students how to juggle, walk on stilts, balance on a giant ball and some tumbling in addition to the real objectives — team building and boosting self-esteem. Photo: The Enquirer, Joseph Fuqua II / AP

His Cincinnati-based circus arts program teaches students how to juggle, walk on stilts, balance on a giant ball and some tumbling in addition to the real objectives — team building and boosting self-esteem.
"It teaches them responsibility, teamwork, respect and commitment. All of that influences their academics and influences their home life," said Debbie Hill, of the nonprofit Community Arts Initiatives, the agency that paid for the $6,000, six-week program at Hillcrest.
It's an unusual step, Grady admits, to have a clown teach troubled teens circus skills, but she wanted to get their attention. Many of them have committed serious crimes, some involving guns.
"Our kids are different — street-savvy kids," the judge said.
Eight Hillcrest students volunteered for the program, the second time the school has held it. They met twice weekly for six weeks, building up to a performance before about 80 people, including fellow students, some parents and school staff.READ MORE AT:
http://www.chron.com/news/article/Circus-clown-trains-Ohio-troubled-teens-2155301.php#photo-2


ABC radio crew run away to the circus

September, 2011

By Liz Hedge

The tent is up, the popcorn's popped, the music's on the loud speaker and the switch has just been flicked on the spotlight....it's show time!

The thought of running away with the circus and performing in front of adoring crowds with all the glamour of the big top can be pretty intoxicating, but the reality often involves a lot of hard work and an immense amount of responsibility.
The Great Moscow Circus has been travelling through regional Australia for the past three years. The company of 48 Artists, crew and family have travelled 65,000 kilometres and performed in more the seventy towns to date.
The General Manager Greg Hall says circus life has changed tremendously over the years. "In the old days you had a canvas tent that you'd be continuously stitching and stitching and if you had rain, it's shelf life was nothing."
"It's one of those things if you do a double somersault on stilts, I'm going to go a triple somersault on stilts," says Greg, "and it's exciting because if you think you've reached the limit of a human doing that in one kind of act, no, think again."
Viktor Martisevich trained in sports and acrobats in Russia and now performs a duo act with his Wife, Katrina, every evening under the big top. The pair also have a six year old daughter who travels with them and attends the school set up for the 15 children travelling with the circus. "We do really organise everything for the kids, and thanks to management we have a school room and a teacher who travels with us."
"A six year old is not a drama at all," says Viktor, "Later on you need a normal school. You have to stop work to give your family an education."
Alfredo de Silva would have had to run away not to be in the circus. As a sixth generation circus performer from Brazil, Alfredo says it's in his blood.
"When I was little I would pretend to be the juggler...but you get bored and the next day you are the clown, and the next week the trapeze artist," Says Alfredo, "It was easy for me to grow up playing, because it was a game."
Take a listen to Dugald and Liz's trip to the circus (Please note: No radio announcers were hurt during the making of this audio) :
http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2011/09/05/3310087.htm
'Stupid, Aggressive' Albino Ostrich Bolts Far-East Circus

05 September 2011

The Moscow Times

A rare, albino ostrich is on the loose in the Far Eastern city of Petropavlosk-Kamchatsky after escaping a traveling circus Sunday night, Interfax reported.
"Two ostriches escaped. One was discovered early Monday morning in the Spartak stadium, where the circus tent is pitched. The second … still hasn't been found," said Vasily Kolos, the administrator of the Anastasiya Circus.
He blamed the incident on circus workers who forgot to close the ostriches' pen.
Given the bird's tremendous top speed — it can run as fast as 70 kilometers per hour — Kolos said that it could be in anywhere in the city by now.
The circus is asking local residents to help find the bird, but Kosol warned against approaching it. "The ostrich is a very stupid and aggressive bird — it's capable of maiming," he said.
The circus-break comes on the heels of another incident in July, when a "depressed" ferret escaped a circus in East Siberian city of Chita. Read more:
http://www.themoscowtimes.com/news/article/stupid-aggressive-albino-ostrich-bolts-far-east-circus/443221.html#ixzz1X59H5jir The Moscow Times
Take your kids to the circus this week


The circus will be in Quincy on Monday. It will stop in Beardstown Tuesday, in Jacksonville Wednesday, Pittsfield Thursday, and Bowling Green Friday


by Brooke Hasch

Brooke Hasch is a Weekend News Anchor for KHQA.

Posted: 09.04.2011

QUINCY, ILL. -- If you're looking for something to do for Labor Day Monday, why not go under the big top?
The Carson and Barnes Circus will perform in Quincy Sunday and Monday, set up just behind the Quincy Mall. You can watch performances at 1:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. Advance tickets for adults are $12, kids ages 2-11 are $6. Tickets at the gate are $18 for adults and $10 for kids.
For 75 years, this family owned circus has toured the country putting on shows. Jugglers, acrobatic teams and dozens of animals are just the beginning. The circus comes to Quincy once every two years.
This year, part of the ticket sales goes to Quest stables, which is a horse therapy facility for children with disabilities.
The circus has a few more stops in the Tri-State area before heading out of town. It will stop in Beardstown Tuesday, in Jacksonville Wednesday, Pittsfield Thursday, and Bowling Green Friday

BILL PRICKETT VISITS PERU, INDIANA

Part One: Paul Kelly Farm.......


My last stop on 8-10-2011, in Peru, Ind, was the Paul Kelly Farm.














#1 and #2 Flyer, circa 1950







Posted by Picasa



Part One: Paul Kelly Farm.......My last stop on 8-10-2011, in Peru, Ind, was the Paul Kelly Farm. I had a short, and very enjoyable visit with
Dorothy (99) and Eddie (80).



I had met them both in July of 1996, just prior to the auction to be held on the premises. The farm still is
owned by Dorothy. It is my understanding , that she stopped the auciton as she did not feel that the bids on items were
realistic. "Terrell Jacobs purchased this property on route 31 across from the Naval Base in the late thirties, and used it for his circus
winter quarters. He had lions, tigers, elephants and other animals. He was the only man who worked 52 lions in the arena at one time.
Arthur Wirt who owned Cole Bros. and Barnes Bros. circus purchased the property from Terrell Jacobs. It was one of the largest
railroad circuses on the road. Paul Kelly was next to acquire the property. Paul was born in the circus, his father Pat Kelly was in the
circus before the turn of the century. Paul and Dorothy opened a museum and tourist attraction. We put on shows, elephant acts, sea lion
acts, dog and pony acts, liberty acts, lion and tiger acts. We had 19 elephants at one time and later put in kiddie rides".... from Dorothy's
history letter. I was able to tour the barns in 1996, and saw the cages and arena were Terrell Jacobs trained the cats. The barn property
is over grown and no open to the public due to vandalism.

Paul Kelly Farm #2














Posted by Picasa

Auction flyer cover from July 27/28, 1996....Paul Kelly Farm.......

Bill Prickett collection

Sunday, September 4, 2011

SUNDAY FUNNIES---

NEW LANE TALBURT VIDEO--

Amazing Sladek: Circus Life in the Balance
LaneInConn



Uploaded by LaneInConn on Sep 3, 2011
Abandoning his plans to be a teacher, Gary Sladek Borstelmann opted for a career in the circus. During the next 33 years, he mastered a dozen different routines, including handstands on stacked chairs. "The Amazing Sladek" shared his experiences with Lane Talburt between performances at a small Connecticut fair.

Larry finds circus roots


Published on Saturday 3 September 2011

from: http://www.thestar.co.uk/news/larry_finds_circus_roots_1_3741704
TV actor Larry Lamb sought the help of the University of Sheffield’s National Fairground Archive to uncover his unusual ancestry for this week’s episode of BBC1 series Who Do You Think You Are?Lamb, 63, known for his roles in BBC soap Eastenders and sitcom Gavin and Stacy, previously knew little about his mother’s side of the family as she had been adopted as a baby.
Helped by staff at the National Fairground Archive to trawl their records, Lamb discovered his fascinating family history - one that includes lion tamers and daredevils who toured the country with a circus-style show.
Larry said: “To be related to these people, to come from the same clan – wow. My mum always nursed this dream that she would meet her mum again so when this programme was offered I thought this would be a good thing. The whole female side and male side were a complete surprise.”

Life's a circus at the Shenandoah Fair


Jonathan Morales rides a unicycle across the tightrope as part of the Zerbini Family Circus at the Shenandoah County Fair. Rich Cooley/Daily


WOODSTOCK, VA-The goes-without-saying disclaimer for audience members at a circus is don't try anything that you're about to see at home. But it's fun to think about trying.
After watching trapeze artists, swords balanced by their tips, high-flying trampoline flips, an aerial ballerina and juggler -- there was nothing on fire that he juggled, so there wasn't too much danger involved with that particular act -- Emma Selby, 15, of Woodstock, was asked if she could have done anything that's a part of the Zerbini Family Circus at the Shenandoah County Fair.
"Be the clown," she said.
If Selby were in the Zerbini bloodline, she'd be closing in on making a decision to be one of its jokesters. Once someone graduates high school, he or she is given a choice -- enter the circus or head off to "regular" life, ringmaster Melody Ramirez said. She selected the circus, where she was thrown into the job as ringmaster, because she gets to be with family every day.
"My husband and I are together all the time," said Ramirez, 30, of Myakka, Fla. "I see my parents, my little brother all the time. And you only have to work about an hour two times a day."
The circus, which is free as part of fair admission, has had two shows each day at the fair this week. There will be three today, at 1, 3 and 5 p.m.




Jennifer Luna performs an aerial act as part of the Zerbini Family Circus at the Shenandoah County Fair

While one of the most popular attractions during fair week involves cars smashing into each other, there is no desire among circus watchers to see anything destructive happen. It's the mere threat of it that gives the show excitement.
Lillian Bowers, of Woodstock, was one of the most animated attendees during a performance this week, mouthing an occasional "oh wow" as she smiled and clapped in reaction to what she saw.
"I thought it was very enjoyable," she said.
The Zerbini family has been getting that kind of feedback going on nearly 100 years, Ramirez said. The circus tours the eastern part of the country and also visits fairs in a number of states, stopping in Pennsylvania, Ohio, New Jersey and Virginia this year, she said. There are 21 performers from Mexico, Peru and Europe.
If Julia Austermann, 16, an exchange student from Germany here for the first semester of school, were to be added to the roster, she'd want to be a juggler. In her home country, the circus is bigger, she said, although that may be more of a product of the Zerbini venue being at the county fair.
Austermann had a different reaction to other sights.
"Everything is bigger [here]," she said, "even the pigs."
Juggling is something Lynn Tucker, Bowers' daughter, might be able to live with if someone in her family were in the circus. Otherwise, she wouldn't be a fan of a loved one trying anything circus-related at home, or for the pleasure of others for that matter.
"No, I don't think so," Tucker said. "I'd be too worried, too anxious."
Let the professionals in the Zerbini family do it instead.
"I thought they put on a very good show," Tucker said.

Residents gather to enjoy circus acts under the big top


Miranda Henderson.

At intermission on Wednesday evening during the Carson & Barnes Circus, area families line up to ride elephants, ponies, and camels; get their faces painted; and have pictures taken with Alex the Clown. The Ringmaster encouraged the crowd to enjoy the intermission and return to their seats within 15 minutes for the next set of daring acts

.By MIRANDA HENDERSON of the Daily Ledger GateHouse News Service

Posted Sep 02, 2011

LEWISTOWN, ILLINOIS — Carson & Barnes Circus hoisted the big top at Fulton County Fairgrounds on Wednesday around 9 a.m. to a crowd of onlookers. As Carson & Barnes set up circus morning, the fairgrounds turn into "Circus City USA," according to organizers of the event.Everyone was invited to watch the transformation take place free of charge.As the first caravans arrived, exotic and domestic animals were unloaded.Adding to the excitement was the final and most popular experience of all -- erecting the big top.Humans and technology worked side-by-side to erect America's most spectacular and largest circus big top."It was just outstanding to watch them put up the big top. We had about 280 kids from the school out there in the morning while they were setting up, and they had a fantastic time. They got to see all the animals and the circus employees took time to talk to the children about the care for each of their exotic animals," says Theresa Strode of the Lewistown Lions Club, one of the sponsoring organizations.Before the show started, children were invited to pet small animals at the petting zoo, ride camels or elephants, play games to win prizes, or slide down the giant slide. Refreshments and snacks could be purchased from the circus vendors before the show started. During the show, the crowd was offered snacks by "candy butchers" or those vendors that shout out to the crowd during the performance, "popcorn, peanuts, cotton candy."At 4:30 p.m. and again at 7:30 p.m. the circus performers delighted residents of all ages.READ MORE AT:http://www.cantondailyledger.com/features/x1069104195/Residents-gather-to-enjoy-circus-acts-under-the-big-top

County fairs reversing declines in attendance

Montgomery County Fair enjoys upward trend in recent years.


Hungry fairgoers shop for food Wednesday, Aug. 31, the first day of the Montgomery County Fair. The fair continues through Labor Day.

By Joanne Huist Smith, Staff Writer

Dayton, Ohio Daily News

September 2, 2011

As entertainment options grow and agriculture communities shrink, the county fair tradition appears to be thriving.
County fairs aren’t big money makers — fair managers say they’re happy just to break even — but attendance is a different story. Organizers say growing crowds on the midway and enticing families with children through the gate and into the barns is the key to a successful fair.
Attendance at the Montgomery County Fair, which runs through Monday, is down about 20 percent over a decade ago, but the trend in recent years shows an upward swing with 82,000 people walking through the gate last year. Fair attendance increased about 10 percent from 2005 to 2010.
In rural Darke County, fair patronage is soaring with more than 203,000 visitors last year and gate receipts of more than $500,000. While Miami County had a dip in patrons last year, fair goers topped 112,000 this summer.
“I see county fairs in a stable trend, if not upwards,” Caroline McColloch, manager of the Miami County Fair said. “They’re not going away anytime soon.”




Jan Underwood/Staff Photographer

Maddie Cleveland of Germantown gets her change after paying to get into the Montgomery County Fair Wednesday, Aug. 31. The fair continues through Labor Day.

Don Michael, president of the Montgomery County Agricultural Society Board of Trustees believes county fairs are more relevant than ever.
The Montgomery County Fairgrounds is on much-sought-after real estate across from Miami Valley Hospital. For years developers have talked about finding better uses for the property, but Michael couldn’t disagree more.
“In 41 years we’ll celebrate our 200th fair,” he said. “I expect we’ll be here.”
GuideStar, a database of nonprofit groups that contains financial filings, indicates that the Montgomery County Agricultural Society reported a significant decrease in fund balances on its 990 form for 2009 compared to the year before. Net assets fell from $128,591 to $80,045, due to decreases in program service revenue, investment income and other revenue, while salaries increased.READ MORE AT:http://www.daytondailynews.com/entertainment/county-fairs-reversing-declines-in-attendance-1244789.html

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