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Monday, May 9, 2011


Montreal’s Cirque Eloize a ‘never-ending onslaught’ of action

By Jim Sullivan

Monday, May 9, 2011

from: bostonherald.com

Cirque Eloize is a Montreal-based troupe that formed out of the same “contemporary circus” scene that launched the world famous Cirque du Soleil.
But Cirque Eloize is different. Unlike the better-known Cirque du Soleil, which performs mostly in tents, this theatrical circus favors a traditional stage.And “iD,” the Cirque Elozie production coming to the Wang Theatre Tuesday through Sunday, is a techno-electronic music-fueled foray into the world of urban dance.
“The idea was to create a show in a future city, similar to ‘Sin City’ or ‘The Spirit,’ said dancer Christian “Sancho” Garmatter. “Something that’s out of a comic book and brought to the stage... and to have this work with video projections and have all these characters in these two gangs.”
Those two gangs nod toward “Romeo and Juliet” and “West Side Story.” The show encompasses 12 circus disciplines, with performers using the trampowall to bounce from trampoline to wall. There is also stilt walking, rope skipping, balancing acts, pole acrobatics, juggling and bicycle stunts in a never-ending onslaught.
“I always like to find something unique,” said Jeannot Painchaud, Eloize’s artistic director, “like a duet with a b-boy and a contortionist, or a roller skater doing a ballet with an aerial silk lady. It’s two different languages and when you put that together it brings you to some other place.”
Garmatter, 28, spent three years in Las Vegas with Cirque du Soleil doing the Beatles show, “LOVE.” With Cirque Eloize, he performs one of the centerpiece acts, as the b-boy dancer in tandem with contortionist Emi Vauthey.
“I’m onstage basically the whole show,” Garmatter said. “As a dancer you’re really active. There’s a lot of supporting scenes and working with the circus artists in their pieces. They call the show ‘iD’ ’cause we want to show the identity of the artists. Each one brings his own skills and it’s part of a game. Sometimes, in my head, I feel like a street fighter.”
Is there real danger in “iD”?
“This is a difficult question,” Painchaud said. “There’s always an element of danger in a circus show. It’s like doing high-level sports. There’s always the risk of breaking your body. But we work with professional people and we train.”
“The people in the audience,” he added, “are at the edge of their seats.”

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