THIS BLOG IS DEDICATED TO MY TWIN BROTHER, BILL DYKES (1943-1995). WE WERE NOT ONLY BROTHERS BUT PARTNERS IN BUSINESS AND BEST FRIENDS! AND TO ALL THE "BUTCHERS" THAT HAVE PASSED ON TO THE BIG LOT IN THE SKY!

CIRCUS NOW OPEN!

2014 Convention

SAVE THE DATES

SAVE THE DATES

Monday, May 31, 2010

DETROIT'S "RICKY THE CLOWN" PASSES

In the early 1950s, Mr. Romig joined WXYZ-TV, eventually hosting a program as Ricky the Clown. (detroitkidsshow.com)
Mr. Romig (detroitkidsshow.com)

Performer loved life as Ricky the ClownMark Hicks /
The Detroit News May 31. 2010
Romig loved clowning around to brighten a kid's day.
For decades the longtime circus performer known as Ricky the Clown regaled young viewers throughout Metro Detroit on his own local TV show. And even through his 80s, he continued donning a wig, bright makeup, rubbery nose and colorful outfits for personal appearances.
"He had an amazing transformation. Truly he became a different person," said Ed Golick, master of detroitkidshow.com, which profiles area children's programing from the 1950s and 1960s.
"He put his heart and soul into his clowning. He lived and breathed being a clown."
Mr. Romig died Sunday, May 23, 2010, after an illness. He was 90.
Born Feb. 1, 1920, in Detroit, he grew up with parents who both performed in the circus.
Performing through his teens, Mr. Romig later served in the Army as an infantryman and K-9 Corps dog trainer, according to Detroit News archives.
Returning to the United States, he joined the Detroit Shrine and Ringling Brothers circuses as a rider and clown.
He later appeared in the 1952 film "The Greatest Show on Earth," relatives said, and wed Rose Dobo, who became part of his act.
In the early 1950s, he joined WXYZ-TV (Channel 7), eventually hosting a program as Ricky the Clown.
"He had a menagerie of animals," Golick said. "He kept a live llama, a miniature buffalo, all kinds of monkeys he'd bring. His gimmick was... a dead-on impression of (entertainer) Al Jolson."
In the early 1950s, he joined WXYZ-TV (Channel 7), eventually hosting a program as Ricky the Clown.
"He had a menagerie of animals," Golick said. "He kept a live llama, a miniature buffalo, all kinds of monkeys he'd bring. His gimmick was... a dead-on impression of (entertainer) Al Jolson."
Mr. Romig loved being "the happy tramp," said his son, Christopher. "He didn't want to be stagnant. He always thought of skits to do. He liked seeing the children happy."
After his show ended in the 1960s, Mr. Romig continued performing for various events.
Describing his love of the gig to The Detroit News in 1971, he said: "...The only way I'm really rich is in the great memories I've got. I remember a lot of funny things and a lot of laughing kids."
Mr. Romig also joined an arts education program and was inducted into the International Clown Hall of Fame in 2001.
"He was upbeat," his son said. "He did exactly what he wanted his entire life."

No comments:

Post a Comment


TO VISIT OUR PAST POSTS--SCROLL DOWN THE SIDE BAR. ALSO LINKS ARE FURTHER DOWN