THIS BLOG IS DEDICATED TO MY TWIN BROTHER, BILL DYKES (1943-1995). WE WERE NOT ONLY BROTHERS BUT PARTNERS IN BUSINESS AND BEST FRIENDS! AND TO ALL THE "BUTCHERS" THAT HAVE PASSED ON TO THE BIG LOT IN THE SKY!

CIRCUS NOW OPEN!

2014 Convention

SAVE THE DATES

SAVE THE DATES

Friday, August 31, 2012


Wow, what a fair!
Annual statewide event creates many memories
 
 
De Smit kindergarten students Gannon Gilligan, Briyah Bryant, Shaylee Duffy, Mirra Beck and Chester Larsen react to Matt Jergens' juggling and comedy show Thursday during the State Fair in Huron.
 / Emily Spartz / Argus Leader
Written by Jill Callison
from: argusleader.com
Aug 30, 2012
HURON — State fairs are designed to make memories.
Clell Swanson made a few of those, both for himself and for the veterans whose hands he shook.
Whenever the 16-year-old saw a former serviceman, easy to spot in American Legion or Veterans of Foreign Wars shirts and caps on the South Dakota State Fair’s opening day, he walked up, extended his right hand and simply said, “Thank you.”
“I have no military history in my family, but Dad and Mom have pounded it into us to give thanks for these guys. Because of them we can do things like this,” said Swanson, who lives south of Sioux Falls and is homeschooled, gesturing at the state fair activities going on around him.
Swanson’s own T-shirt bore the insignia of the U.S. Marines, and he plans to enlist within the next year or two. In the meantime, he planned to enjoy the state fair Thursday and today before returning home.
He was joined by hundreds of others.
“Looking around the grounds, I’d say we were pretty consistent with last year, and (attendance) might be up,” said Jerome Hertel, state fairgrounds manager. “I’m encouraged by what I’ve seen so far.”
The weather cooperated, with a sky that was overcast for several hours with a cool breeze and little of the humidity to be found farther south.
Farmers and ranchers with deep roots in South Dakota were honored for having land in the family for 100 and 125 years. As each family received a certificate, a descendant shared a piece of family history.
“Grandpa and Grandma came from Illinois in 1884,” explained Melvin Johnson of Sully County.
His uncle, the oldest of two sons, kept the homestead. Johnson had to wait for the award until 100 years after the second purchase of a quarter in 1911 made him eligible.
Gordy Salmen spoke as the third generation of his family to farm 18 miles south of Wessington. He was joined on stage by his mother, Phyllis, and a brother, Tim.
Tim Salmen gave the credit for the 100-year honor to his brother.
“I helped, but we might not have made it to the centennial without him,” he said.
read more:
http://www.argusleader.com/article/DF/20120831/VOICES/308310014/Wow-what-fair-?odyssey=nav%7Chead

No comments:

Post a Comment


TO VISIT OUR PAST POSTS--SCROLL DOWN THE SIDE BAR. ALSO LINKS ARE FURTHER DOWN